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Moist-crumbed and heady with exotic yuzu, you will want to slice into this good-natured one-bowl French yogurt cake as soon as it is pulled from the oven. Resist the temptation, my friends, because it tastes even better the next day. And the next. Serve with the freshest summer berries.

Moist-crumbed and heady with exotic yuzu, you will want to slice into this good-natured one-bowl French yogurt cake as soon as it is pulled from the oven. Resist the temptation, my friends, because it tastes even better the next day. And the next. Serve with the freshest summer berries.Moist-crumbed and heady with exotic yuzu, you will want to slice into this good-natured French yogurt cake as soon as it is pulled from the oven. Resist the temptation, my friends, because it tastes even better the next day. And the next. Serve with the freshest summer berries.

Moist-crumbed and heady with exotic yuzu, you will want to slice into this good-natured one-bowl French yogurt cake as soon as it is pulled from the oven. Resist the temptation, my friends, because it tastes even better the next day. And the next. Serve with the freshest summer berries.Besides polenta cakes (fill your boots here), yogurt cakes are my favourite cakes to bake. And truthfully, they are my favourite to eat. It is not just that they are so flipping easy. I adore the slightly open yet moist (a most hated word to some, but unavoidable here) texture. And the fact it gets better with age and offers up a beautiful, lactic-meets-barely-sweet taste. These French yogurt cakes are just heavenly.

I had my first such cake at the home of one of Rachel’s nursery school chums, a French, ringlet-haired sweetheart with the biggest brown eyes I’ve ever seen. The family lived in a minuscule flat in an exceedingly quaint whitewashed 18th-century building, overlooking the River Almond. Although the walls were subsiding a bit and there was the constant threat of damp, the girl’s mum managed to not only work from home as a translator, Céline was also the most incredible baker.

yuzu marmalade also goes by the name of yuzu teaThis was back in the days when I really didn’t know much about baking. I didn’t grow up in a cakey house so was intrigued and delighted by the procession of cakes, breads and other bakes that would emerge from Céline’s tiny, seen-better-days oven. To her, it was really no big deal: fougasse, eclairs, cheesy bacon-flecked bread, fairy cakes and, best of all, yogurt cake.

Every day she baked. I was really quite in awe of her. Neat as a pin flat, two children under the age of five, self-employed in what she trained for, AND an enviable baker. One day I plucked up the courage to ask for some recipes. After a quizzical look (I think because they were such easy recipes; why didn’t I know them already) she duly pulled out a pad from her tidy desk and wrote out not only her basic bread recipe but also the secret to my favourite, her yogurt cake. From vague recollection, this was literally one of those recipes that stipulated a yogurt pot of this and a yogurt pot of that. I made it a few times, successfully, but managed to lose her recipes – in her beautiful, curly French hand, – in the great cull of 2001.

We lost touch when they moved back to France so I was never able to ask again for those recipes. She, whose name I had to sieve through my mind just now to recall, introduced me to good, straightforward baking.

I can’t say that I bake a lot for us. In fact, my poor Rachel would say, when she used to see me baking, “that’s for Maggie’s, isn’t it?” Yes, I bake for my nutrition groups, mainly uber healthy, often vegan. But sometimes we treat ourselves to cakes such as this. And I wish I could thank charming, very French Céline for sharing her cake, wisdom and cool Gallic vibe with me.

Of course, it did not rub off. 

Oh, while I’m here, my recipe subs some of the flour with homemade oat flour. I share this tip and a number of other healthy baking tips over on McCarthy & Stone for their campaign supporting Royal Voluntary Service’s annual GrandFest event. Tips on crafts of all kinds will be on this link, too. Go have a look. 🙂

Are you a devotee of the French yogurt cake? Do you have a French pal who simultaneously makes you feel both cool and hopelessly inadequate? Probs not the latter

Moist-crumbed and heady with exotic yuzu, you will want to slice into this good-natured one-bowl French yogurt cake as soon as it is pulled from the oven. Resist the temptation, my friends, because it tastes even better the next day. And the next. Serve with the freshest summer berries.

Yuzu French Yogurt Cake

  • Servings: 10 slices
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Moist-crumbed and heady with exotic yuzu, you will want to slice into this good-natured French yogurt cake as soon as it is pulled from the oven. Resist the temptation, my friends, because it tastes even better the next day. And the next. Serve with the freshest summer berries. xx

150g (1 cup) plain/AP flour

50g (1/2 cup) oat flour, made by blending the oats in a blender/food processor (or use all flour)

2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp fine salt

45ml (1/4 cup) oil of choice (I use a fruity mild olive oil)

65g (1/2 cup) unrefined caster sugar/superfine sugar

3 large organic eggs

165g (3/4 cup) plain yogurt

1 tsp vanilla

130g (scant 1/2 cup) yuzu marmalade (often called yuzu honey tea) – I get mine cheaply from my local Chinese supermarket + extra for glazing. You could use grapefruit marmalade although yuzu is quite different (better!)

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 160C fan/180C/350F. Oil and base-line a 1 lb loaf tin.

2. Sift the flour with the baking powder and salt; stir in the oat flour.

3. Use electric beaters to whisk together the oil, sugar and eggs; whisk in the yogurt and vanilla. Tip in the dry ingredients and beat just until mixed. Fold in the yuzu marmalade by hand.

Moist-crumbed and heady with exotic yuzu, you will want to slice into this good-natured one-bowl French yogurt cake as soon as it is pulled from the oven. Resist the temptation, my friends, because it tastes even better the next day. And the next. Serve with the freshest summer berries.4. Pour the ridiculously tempting batter into the prepared tin and bake for 40 minutes – up to one hour if at all wobbly in the middle or if an inserted skewer or sharp knife comes out anything but clean.

5. Completely cool on a wire rack before cutting into slices and serving with freshly whipped cream or yogurt, and fresh fruit. 

Ripe for Pinning

Moist-crumbed and heady with exotic yuzu, you will want to slice into this good-natured one-bowl French yogurt cake as soon as it is pulled from the oven. Resist the temptation, my friends, because it tastes even better the next day. And the next. Serve with the freshest summer berries.

This is not a paid post. I am happy to support the work of the Royal Volunteer Service without payment.

20 thoughts on “How to Make French Yogurt Cake with Yuzu Marmalade

  1. writely2015 says:

    That looks like a recipe keeper. Awesome photos!

  2. Megala says:

    Looks stunning & sounds delicious! Thanks for sharing the recipe!

  3. That looks so good! I will attempt this someday when I’m feeling brave 🙂

  4. What a fabulous cake to pair with all the seasonal fruit that is just coming into summer. Peaches, apricots and nectarines with plums close behind. Yes to summer!

  5. Oh this looks divine! Not sure I’ve seen yuzu here, but I’ll have to check our local Asian markets and see if I can get my hands on some. I agree re: yoghurt cakes. So simple and satisfying, a lovely treat for afternoon tea. My mouth is watering!

  6. Reblogged this on All About Writing and more.

  7. Going on my list of ones to try. Fell in love with yuzu on my first trip to Japan. I now have my own tree, being nursed through it’s first colder winter ( yes we have them in Australia).

  8. Mary says:

    Sounds divine. Can’t imagine it needs dressing up with cream (though I look forward to hunting down the marmalade). I use oil when baking a honey cake. I find I have to pour it in slowly and mix thoroughly between, otherwise it turns out soggy. What about your cake?

    1. Tbh we don’t eat cream either but it’s a cake that lends itself to it – whipped coconut cream (the super thick stuff that attaches itself to the tin whips best) is brilliant. I’ve not had any issues with this cake and adding the oil but I do like it thoroughly incorporated before adding the dry ingredients. Let me know if you try this 😊😊

  9. Katie @ Whole Nourishment says:

    Yes, I do love a good yogurt cake and in fact, just had a Spanish version the other day. It was homemade using a recipe passed down by a great-grandmother. Yours looks great, especially with the tang I imagine the yuzu gives? And I had to laugh about the “M” word. 😉 So true. I’m one of those people, but sometimes there’s no other word better suited to describe food.

  10. Your images are gorgeous. I so want to upgrade my camera, or perhaps I don’t need to… I have a point and shoot Canon.

  11. joiedevivre1999 says:

    Truly your every dish is killing me with curiosity to make and eat…..just saw your blog!! Superrb! Yummieeee!

    1. Thanks for the enthusiasm – and the kind follow. Have a great day! 😊😊

  12. stateeats says:

    A thousand yeses on this one! -Kat

  13. Exciting for me because Ive never made a yogurt cake before and I do love the Straight up yogurt by The Collective which i normally have in my fridge so excellent timing as I have guests arrive this week, thank you!

    1. I’d love to think you were making this lovely straightforward cake for your visitors. Make it ahead and it’s even better xx

  14. dtills says:

    This is great- I love it when there is recipe with an ingredient that I haven’t worked with before and yuzu is definitely that! Thanks for sharing!

  15. Mark says:

    This looks absolutely delicious!

  16. Jessi says:

    Wow, that cake look super delicious in those beautiful pictures!!! Definitely going to be my next dessert. Thanks for sharing!

  17. This sounds sooooo delicious and your pictures are just stunning!

If you have time, I would love to hear from you. Thanks so much!

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