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Earthy, tangy beets married with smooth creamy ricotta in crunchy filo make a delightful and simple starter or light lunch. Add intriguing nigella seeds and you’ve got the wow factor. A colourful, lip-smacking vegetarian recipe for special occasions – and no occasion!

In partnership with Love Beetroot

Earthy, tangy beets married with smooth creamy ricotta in crunchy filo make a delightful and simple starter or light lunch. Add intriguing nigella seeds and you've got the wow factor. A colourful, lip-smacking vegetarian recipe for special occasions - and no occasion!Earthy, tangy beets married with smooth creamy ricotta in crunchy filo make a delightful and simple starter or light lunch. Add intriguing nigella seeds and you’ve got the wow factor. A colourful, lip-smacking vegetarian recipe for special occasions – and no occasion!

Beets – like cauliflower – have enjoyed something of a renaissance of late. After many years in the culinary wilderness, beetroot is back.

Earthy, tangy beets married with smooth creamy ricotta in crunchy filo make a delightful and simple starter or light lunch. Add intriguing nigella seeds and you've got the wow factor. A colourful, lip-smacking vegetarian recipe for special occasions - and no occasion!It’s raw, it’s crisped; it’s juiced, souped, gratineed, curried, baked in cakes and scones, and blitzed into smoothies. In fact no self-respecting health-aware person can ignore its health benefits. Not only the obvious good-for-you fibre, but the unique array of antioxidants and phytonutrients that have researchers scrambling to document its potential use in disease prevention: type 2 diabetes, some cancers, heart disease and eye diseases spring to mind.

The superstars are betalain pigments, a group of compounds that make up the vibrant colours (deep red and deep yellow). Betalains are hugely antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. But that’s not all of course: all varieties of beets are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium and copper. They are also a good source of dietary fiber, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamin C, iron and vitamin B6. So, all good on the nutrition front.

Sadly, many peoples’ only experiences of beets are negative: over-cooked and heavily-vinegared. I shunned beets for ages, previously having only tasted them as an evil side dish vegetable at school. But in recent years things have changed, and now you can get cooked, packaged beets that are a positive taste addition to the diet, rather than something you feel you should eat because they are healthy. No long boiling or roasting; no messy peeling and days of “murderous” fingers. Just earthy sweetness in an instant.

As part of the #DontSkipABeet campaign from Love Beetrootchef director Dan Doherty from London’s famed Duck and Waffle has developed some beautifully varied, nutritious and enticing recipes to get us all reaching for beetroot again. Below is the one I tested, and my goodness it’s good! I made these easy tartlets for a family gathering and they were gobbled up with gusto, with not even a shard of phyllo left on the plate. I stretched it to serve five, but do keep it at four – or increase the recipe accordingly. Check their website for loads more ideas and recipes.

Get quality cooked and seasoned (or not) beetroot in the chiller cabinet with the salad ingredients.

Earthy, tangy beets married with smooth creamy ricotta in crunchy filo make a delightful and simple starter or light lunch. Add intriguing nigella seeds and you've got the wow factor. A colourful, lip-smacking vegetarian recipe for special occasions - and no occasion!

Sweet Chilli Beetroot and Ricotta Tartlets

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Earthy, tangy beets married with smooth creamy ricotta in crunchy filo make a delightful and simple starter or light lunch. Add intriguing nigella seeds and you’ve got the wow factor. A colourful, lip-smacking vegetarian recipe for special occasions – and no occasion!

–PS my notes on the recipe are in parentheses

4 sheets filo pastry

4 sweet chilli beetroots, cut into 1/2cm pieces

3 tablespoons ricotta (use a little more if you wish)

Pinch chives, finely chopped

Pinch nigella seeds

50g grated parmesan (or vegetarian hard cheese)

1 (medium) egg

20g melted butter

Sea salt

Black pepper

Olive oil (I used smoked olive oil – highly recommended)Earthy, tangy beets married with smooth creamy ricotta in crunchy filo make a delightful and simple starter or light lunch. Add intriguing nigella seeds and you've got the wow factor. A colourful, lip-smacking vegetarian recipe for special occasions - and no occasion!Method

  1. Preheat your oven to 180 C.
  2. To make the tart mix, in a bowl add the beetroot, ricotta, egg, chives, nigella seeds and half the Parmesan and gently mix together. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Butter 4 ramekins and set aside for later. (I used loose based tartlet cases)
  4. Flatten the filo sheets and brush each one with melted butter.
  5. Fold over itself so it’s half the size, then brush with butter again.*
  6. Rustically put each one into a ramekin, pushing down so it’s touching the bottom.
  7. Divide the mix between each case.
  8. Sprinkle the rest of the Parmesan over each one and put in the oven for 10-12 minutes. **
  9. When ready, drizzle with olive oil and either serve in the pots or lift out so it’s released from the pot.

* I think it’s best to cut a square of filo that you think should fit, and try it in the case/ramekin that you’re using. Adjust the size until you get the optimum “sticky-up bits” and then cut the rest out accordingly. I made four squares for each tartlet case, buttering lightly and off-setting each one as I laid it in the case.

** I added the remaining cheese after the hot tarts were pulled from the oven.

Can’t get enough beetroot? Scroll and select recipes from my beetroot recipes link page.

Earthy, tangy beets married with smooth creamy ricotta in crunchy filo make a delightful and simple starter or light lunch. Add intriguing nigella seeds and you've got the wow factor. A colourful, lip-smacking vegetarian recipe for special occasions - and no occasion!Thank you to Love Beetroot for sponsoring this post. Partnered posts such as this help me to keep bringing you my recipes and content – for free. Thanks to you as well, for supporting not only me but also the quality brands with which I work. I only partner with brands I actually use and like. All opinions are strictly my own.

24 thoughts on “Sweet Chilli Beetroot and Ricotta Tartlets Recipe

  1. chefkreso says:

    The photos are incredible, and I can only believe that the recipe is even better 😀

    1. Aww, thank you! You are very kind 🙂

  2. Your food styling/photography for this post is fantastic 🙂

    1. Thanks for your appreciation. 🙂

  3. We’re both showing beets much love this week. 😉 These tartlets would make a proper ladies lunch. So beautiful, and I know tasty, as they’re coming out of your kitchen. I especially like how you make a savory custard by adding an egg to the ricotta. Hope you’re enjoying this spring season Kellie!

    1. I can’t take credit for the recipe, Katie but I did give my own spin to the instructions 🙂 I will pop over and see what beet delights you have up just now. I have planted some pretty varieties in the garden so hopefully more recipes from me later when they are harvested. If the squirrels don’t find them first!

  4. Beautiful! Looks like dessert!

  5. What a lovely lunch recipe when having friends over – colourful, tastie and very pretty. Lovely blue backdrop too, I think I saw it when you found it on instagram, super find x

    1. I actually want to eat off of it, I love it so much! It’s from my city centre treasure trove, Homer. Where you got the sheepskin rug for your work chair 🙂

  6. susurrus says:

    Love the flowers, love the styling against that wonderful blue background and the food looks delicious!

    1. Thank you. They are wild flowers from my garden and the background is a vintage metal trunk I got recently. I am very much in love with it!

  7. The plating is goregous. This dish would be a tasty substitute for a bouquet of flowers.

    1. Aw thank you, Jamison. I do love flowers though!

  8. thank goodness the beetroot is back! Such a lovely, light idea. I was thinking of making a quiche this weekend and now I know what my key ingredient will be… beetroot… adorable. Happy Easter x

    1. Thanks, Dom. I trust you had a fantastic weekend, full of food and fun 🙂

  9. Sarah Hunt says:

    What a stunning dish. As a vegetarian I am so proud to be able to say that our food can be beautiful and not just a bunch of greens on a plate! I recently had the pleasure of seeing come amazing food art which heavily featured sliced beetroot; such a glorious vegetable.
    Beetroot was an evil side-dish in my childhood too. But with a more mature palette, and more awareness of how to cook and flavour them, I have been loving including beetroot in my salads and am looking for ways to branch out into full on pink dishes. I can’t wait to make them taste as good as they look.

    1. Beetroot, in its numerous hues, and attractive inner stripes is indeed art. It is probably one of the reasons I was first drawn to beetroot as a gardener. those stripey supple leaves above deep crimson orbs are as pretty as they are good. Sarah, thanks for taking the time to leave such a considered comment. 🙂

  10. stateeats says:

    Wow, the color of those babies is to die for! -Kat

  11. deliriarose says:

    It looks so yummy! And the pictures are amazing 🙂
    http://www.deliriarose.com

  12. Looks delicious and amazing pictures.

If you have time, I would love to hear from you. Thanks so much!

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