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Scandinavian crispbreads made with minimal flour, some salt, oil, water and sesame, flax, poppy and sunflower seeds (and a few aromatic ones too) are a crunchy, delicate platform for butter, cheese, pickled herring and anything at all savoury. They are superb crunchy accompaniment to soup, too. Versions of knækbrød are eaten all over Denmark, Sweden and Norway and considered essential foods. High in protein, healthy fats and fiber, these are a near-perfect snack.

Scandinavian crispbreads made with minimal flour, some salt, oil, water and sesame, flax, poppy and sunflower seeds (and a few aromatic ones too) are a crunchy, delicate platform for butter, cheese, pickled herring and anything at all savoury. They are superb crunchy accompaniment to soup, too. Versions of knækbrød are eaten all over Denmark, Sweden and Norway and considered essential foods. High in protein, healthy fats and fiber, these are a near-perfect snack.Scandinavian seeded crispbreads made with minimal flour, some salt, oil, water and sesame, flax, poppy and sunflower seeds (and a few aromatic ones too) are a crunchy, delicate platform for butter, cheese, pickled herring and anything at all savoury. They are a superb crunchy accompaniment to soup, too. Versions of knækbrød are eaten all over Denmark, Sweden and Norway and considered essential foods. High in protein, healthy fats and fiber, these are a near-perfect snack.

Don’t make these crispbreads. Really, don’t. Not because they aren’t good. No, don’t make them because a recent, highly-scientific study of three people says they are highly addictive. Eating one makes you eat more, and more, and more.

https://kelliesfoodtoglow.com/2013/02/07/my-quest-for-perfect-hummus/

Soup coming soon – spring in a bowl courgette, broccoli, pea & basil! With my scandi crispbreads

It seems to be a gateway snack. Sufferers find they also crave dips and butter, jam and Marmite, soups and cheese. They will go to great lengths to eat them, including baking them when dinner needs to be made, or even when everyone is completely full and needs no. more. food.

Scandinavian crispbreads made with minimal flour, some salt, oil, water and sesame, flax, poppy and sunflower seeds (and a few aromatic ones too) are a crunchy, delicate platform for butter, cheese, pickled herring and anything at all savoury. They are superb crunchy accompaniment to soup, too. Versions of knækbrød are eaten all over Denmark, Sweden and Norway and considered essential foods. High in protein, healthy fats and fiber, these are a near-perfect snack.I was inspired to make these lovely, delicate rye and oat Scandinavian-style crispbreads from a recent trip to Copenhagen with my very dear friend and surface design goddess, Niki.

We stayed at the very hip Hotel SP34, located centrally on the sweetest, trendiest street in the area, that also happened to serve the finest continental breakfast I’ve had the pleasure of eating.

Every morning was a fresh and wholesome selection of vegetables, fruits, local meats and cheeses, the best Bircher muesli ever (served in Weck jars. Love a Weck.), flaky buttery pillowy croissants, sturdy rye bread, thick white tangy butter, soft boiled eggs, crazy amounts of unusual condiments, tiny homemade fruity cakes, and addictive crispbreads. There was a lot of Instagramming around us. I refrained, for the most part. hotel-sp34-copenhagen

Of course I have had crispbreads before. My blogging friend and new mum Katie (author of the fab nutrition-minded muffinmyth) had sent me some really rather fab ones from Stockholm; I eked those out for as long as possible. But I have had nothing like these seeded, more-ish Danish crackers. My version (and SP34’s) are too frangible and seed-heavy to be commercially made, so homemade is the only option.

Naturally I was curious to know the recipe. When I asked, the morning baker replied modestly, in perfect English, “oh it’s just wheat flour, olive oil, seeds, water and salt”. Upon my return I did some sleuthing on the Interwebs and found that they often have rye and oats instead of wheat. I went for this option. I also opted for sunflower, sesame, pumpkin and flaxseeds. So far, so normal. But, after a couple of increasingly more thinly rolled batches, I got daring and threw in aromatic seeds, seaweed and a hint of chilli. And here I will stay. I think it’s a keeper.

But really, don’t make them. 

Scandinavian crispbreads made with minimal flour, some salt, oil, water and sesame, flax, poppy and sunflower seeds (and a few aromatic ones too) are a crunchy, delicate platform for butter, cheese, pickled herring and anything at all savoury. They are superb crunchy accompaniment to soup, too. Versions of knækbrød are eaten all over Denmark, Sweden and Norway and considered essential foods. High in protein, healthy fats and fiber, these are a near-perfect snack.

Scandinavian Multi-Seed Crispbreads

  • Servings: 2 large baking trays
  • Difficulty: moderately easy
  • Print

Scandinavian crispbreads made with essentially minimal flour, some salt, oil, water and sesame, flax, poppy and sunflower seeds (and a few aromatic ones in this recipe) are a crunchy, delicate platform for butter, cheese, pickled herring and anything at all savoury. They are superb crunchy accompaniment to soup, too. Take time to roll them as thinly as you can, patching inevitable tears with your fingers as needed.  It really makes a difference. They will keep for quite awhile once cooled completely and stored in an air-tight container. This recipe is easily doubled. xx

100g rolled oats

100g rye flour or wheat flour

50g each flaxseeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds

25g poppy seeds

2 tbsp kombu or dulse flakes (dried seaweed) – optional

2 tsp fennel seeds, cracked – optional

1 tsp cumin seeds – optional

1 tsp kalonji (Nigella seeds/black onion seeds) – optional

1/4 tsp dried chilli flakes, crushed

3/4 tsp flaky salt + extra for optional topping

50ml good olive oil

150ml warm water (a dribble or so more if absolutely necessary)

Method:

1. Heat the oven to 180C/160C (fan)/350F. Take out two large baking trays and a roll of parchment paper.

2. Add all of the dried ingredients to a very large, spacious bowl, stir with your hands, then tip in the oil and water. Stir very well. Squidge with your hands if needs be. The dough is very thick.

3. Take three sheets of parchment paper and place the baking trays on them and pull up on all sides to form the shape of the trays. This will be your rolling guide. Half the dough and place on one piece, topping with one of the others. Roll as thinly as you can, patching and shaping as you go. With practice and daring it gets easier to obtain a uniform thinness. Peel off the top paper and lay the dough with the underneath paper on one of the trays. Lightly score into pieces with a sharp knife, if you wish. Carry on with the remaining dough. Sprinkle over flaky salt if you like.Scandinavian crispbreads made with minimal flour, some salt, oil, water and sesame, flax, poppy and sunflower seeds (and a few aromatic ones too) are a crunchy, delicate platform for butter, cheese, pickled herring and anything at all savoury. They are superb crunchy accompaniment to soup, too. Versions of knækbrød are eaten all over Denmark, Sweden and Norway and considered essential foods. High in protein, healthy fats and fiber, these are a near-perfect snack.

4. Place the trays in the oven and bake the soon-to-be crackers for 15 minutes. Swap the trays around and bake for a further 15 minutes. Do another swap and bake for 10 to 15 more minutes, until quite golden. Let cool and break into pieces, or crack along the scored lines with a heavy knife. Store in an air-tight container for up to two weeks.

Variation: If you want to pair this with both sweet and savoury foods, why not leave out the optional ingredients and add 2 tsp of maple syrup? It doesn’t make this sweet but it will make it more agreeable for slathering with jam.

Serving suggestions: pickled herring (traditional), soft cheese, butter, pate (traditional), hummus (here is my favourite hummus recipe) and other dips, with soup, topped with hard-boiled eggs and radishes, etc.

 

** If you are reading this from the website Easy Low Cal Recipes, this is published without my permission – as are all other posts of mine on this site. **Scandinavian crispbreads made with minimal flour, some salt, oil, water and sesame, flax, poppy and sunflower seeds (and a few aromatic ones too) are a crunchy, delicate platform for butter, cheese, pickled herring and anything at all savoury. They are superb crunchy accompaniment to soup, too. Versions of knækbrød are eaten all over Denmark, Sweden and Norway and considered essential foods. High in protein, healthy fats and fiber, these are a near-perfect snack.Scandinavian crispbreads made with minimal flour, some salt, oil, water and sesame, flax, poppy and sunflower seeds (and a few aromatic ones too) are a crunchy, delicate platform for butter, cheese, pickled herring and anything at all savoury. They are superb crunchy accompaniment to soup, too. Versions of knækbrød are eaten all over Denmark, Sweden and Norway and considered essential foods. High in protein, healthy fats and fiber, these are a near-perfect snack.

 

29 thoughts on “Scandinavian Multi-Seed Crispbread Recipe with A Fragrant Twist

  1. Mr A says:

    These are insanely good!

  2. Yana says:

    Everything sounds amazing! Your post made me want to pack my bag and visit Copenhagen, but before that..make this crispbread 🙂
    Thank you for that recipe!

  3. Adding this to my ‘experiment’ list immediately! Also, I love your variations and serving suggestions. Thank you for sharing. –Deb

  4. They look so good….I definitely won’t be making them!!! 😉

  5. I love crispbreads and this looks a particularly tasty variety of them. I won’t make them LOL!

    1. No, don’t. Slippery slope. 🙂

  6. Pang says:

    Ok, I won’t make them, but I will come over to your house and eat yours instead 😛
    These snacks look insanely good. I need to go against your advice now, Kellie.

    1. Aw you are very kind. I do wish you were close enough to come by. It would be lovely to meet you – and to pick your brain about photography!

  7. Hehe, well you know already how greedy I can get with said crispbreads 😋 and you’ve gone and made them with an extra whole dimension of deliciousness – you are so bad but oh so good too 😀 Adore the idea of adding some seaweed, thats properly brilliant. Hey thanks +blush+ about your very lovely shout out, way too kind but I’m happy to just say thank you! ⭐

    1. No more than you deserve, clever design lady. AND, you weren’t the one who smuggled back SP34 crispbreads in your hand luggage as “research” 😉

  8. Fuss Free Helen says:

    They look glorious Kellie, and you know what – I am going to ignore you and make them!

  9. These look incredible! I’ve always meant to make my own crispbreads as the bought ones are often so dull but never got around to it!

  10. crasterkipper says:

    I made these immediately with just the ingredients I had in (so no seaweed)! Wow, they are so more-ish, never mind storing for 2 weeks… they may not last the evening! I don’t know how you got yours to brown so evenly – mine were various colours but it didn’t seem to affect the delicious taste. Thanks for this wonderful recipe which I can feel is leading me into a whole new experience of cracker making 🙂

    1. I’m so glad you tried them – and seem to love them as much as we do! Yes, the storage time is largely theoretical. I did keep some back from an early batch just to test, and they were still nice and crisp after 14 days. As for the browning, I’m not sure why mine are uniformly golden. Maybe to do with our ovens? I do switch my trays around a bit too. Thanks for your wonderful feedback. I hope you make a version of your own too. I think at a lower temperature these would be fab with a little dried fruit. 😊😊😊

  11. Pinnatifid says:

    I cannot wait to make these!

  12. I looooove knækbrød but have never made them myself as we find so many varieties here! Am inspired to make some now! Gorgeous post Kellie!!

    1. Thanks so much, Naina. I can imagine that you will have a very good choice of lovely crispbreads to choose from so haven’t been tempted to make your own. We are like that with oatcakes! But these are so easy and so satisfying that I do hope that you give them a go. I’ve had good feedback on Instagram on this recipe. 🙂

  13. I don’t want to make these. I know I would eat them all in one go, as you say, they are so moreish! I buy so many cackers instead of biscuits for the kids. They love them as much as me and these would be perfect, so textured which I love.

  14. Cooksister says:

    OMG I LOVE YOU! I have some dulse from northern Ireland and I have been pondering what to make with it!! Problem solved (and I am a total sucker for Scandi crispbread anyway). Thanks for giving me a project for the coming week while I am still on sick leave after my op!

  15. superfitbabe says:

    These remind me of those seedy crackers that people would use to spread avocado and vegan cream cheese, except SO much tastier. And there’s a scientific study saying that you’ll come back for more and more? Challenge accepted.

  16. stateeats says:

    Am sooo making these but am traveling to this region next month so I hope to taste some crispbreads there too. -Kat

  17. G. Caren says:

    Hi Kellie, Crispbreads! Wow, this is totally new. I would really like to try them. I don’t care if I have to eat it more and more. I can’t miss eating them for sure. I think I can add more flavor to it by adding some sweet flavor or dark chocolates. Thanks for giving this idea. Keep sharing more.

  18. Lovely post. Thanks for sharing.

  19. These are amazing! Made a batch today, along with some hummus, and now it’s taking all my willpower to not go and eat the lot 🙂 I did make a couple of adaptations to adjust to what I had in and this weekend I’m going to try the slightly sweetened version but with a few finely chopped sweetened cranberries in them. I love experimenting 🙂

    By the way, the parchment paper stuck to the bottom of the crispbreads. Any tips?

  20. Patrizia says:

    Now I understand your words: don’t make them. I made them this morning and they are TOO good, I am eating the whole batch piece by piece, wow, they are really wonderful and highly addictive!!!

    1. Haha 😀 I was the same! I have made them waaaay too often now 🙂

  21. Sara Nebeling says:

    We all need to buy stock in edible seed producers! Making these every week. Wonderful!

If you have time, I would love to hear from you. Thanks so much!

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