Spicy Cauliflower-Cashew Bites with Wild Garlic Sauce and American ‘Buffalo’ Sauce (vegan/g-f)

creole cauliflower bitesThis past week or so has been a funny one, food-wise. Normally I am a bit of a texture-head, loving a bit of crunch, a bit of snap (if not quite crackle and pop). But unfortunately a spring cold rapidly escalated into sinusitis, and all that entails.

I feel a few of you recoiling – sorry.

Fond of the old self-remedy thing I have been fighting fever and aches with infusions of golden turmeric milk and doses of assorted green smoothies (this and this are on heavy rotation) and my beetroot zinger juice. Noodles have also featured highly. And soup. All in quite small amounts for me. Mr A knows it’s serious when I am off my grub!  Continue reading

About these ads

A Simple Green Smoothie – breakfast in a glass + Cherry Active review

simple kale smoothie green smoothie“Oh, thrice and four times happy those who plant cabbages.” Francois Rabelais, 16th century French writer

M. Rabelais might now be in the minority with that opinion, but from a health standpoint, he’s spot on. Cabbages have been cultivated for at least 6000 years, probably originating from wild, non-head forming greens (acephala), of which modern kale is perhaps the truest descendent.

Our forebears may not have known why kale and cabbages are so fiercely good for us, but historical figures have thought well enough of it to pass comment: Pythagoras praised it as an all-purpose remedy; Hippocrates (who else) declared it “the vegetable of a thousand virtues“. Continue reading

Loaded Cauliflower ‘Couscous’ Salad with Roasted Turmeric Chickpeas + THAT Study

cauliflower couscous salad“Let food by thy medicine, and medicine be thy food.” Hippocrates (father of medicine), 431 BC

So, it’s out with the five-a-day message and in with the 7. Or perhaps 10. Or maybe just more than we are currently eating.

All hail kale. And sweet potatoes. And tomatoes…. Continue reading

Making Sunflower Butter + Slow-baked Sunflower Granola

 

slow-baked sunflower butter granolaMy love of breakfast is pretty well established. Not only is my Instagram feed chocka with variations of avocado on toast and a million ways to eat chard before 9 am, but I will eat breakfast at non-breakfast times too. I sometimes prefer it that way. That way I can legitimately have dinner leftovers for breakfast! I can’t be the only one who does that. Am I? Continue reading

Mediterranean Stuffed Peppers – naturally vegan, naturally delicious

mediterranean stuffed peppers - veganThe stuffed vegetable needs no introduction, especially to anyone from around the Mediterranean or in the Middle East. The farcis, dolmades, yemista, mahashi/mehshi – all can be exquisite examples of a country’s cuisine. Heat-softened, spoonsful of tender herb-flecked grains pressed into the hollowed out spaces – humble, easily grown vegetables elevated to the centre of the plate.

Laid out on a long, well-scrubbed wooden table, underneath the only shade for miles around, who could wish for more than plates of stuffed vegetables, a chewy round of bread and a few friends with whom to share it all.

Continue reading

Fragrant Butternut Squash, Lentil and Lemongrass Curry + Cumin Seed Chapati

butternut squash curryOne can buy very good bought curry pastes nowadays, but there is just something extra-bright and fresh about a homemade paste. And it isn’t hard to make: I just pop everything into the bowl of my little mini chop thingy* and press ‘on.’ It is that easy. Continue reading

A Green Smoothie for the Green-phobe

green smoothieDespite the clearly undisguised green of this green smoothie, I pretty much guarantee that once sipped even the the most stridently anti-greens guy or gal will at least say, ‘hmm, not as bad as I thought it was going to be.’ Score!

If they are actually scared to try it either say 1) ‘will you just get over yourself’ (my option if I’ve had no sleep), or 2) ‘I will pay you. Just try it.’ Or a combination of the two.

If it is your good self who is unaccountably afraid of the big bad green smoothie, just take a gander at the ingredients: pineapple, clementine, banana. And a little bit of spinach. The mild, baby stuff. If you can handle the more bitter end of the leafy greens – I’m talking about kale really – go for it. The more bitter the better from a nutrition and disease-prevention standpoint.

Whether a novice green smoothie maker/imbiber or not, most fruit (and vegetable) smoothies are best if at least one of the ingredients is frozen. I know you can use ice – and I sometimes do – but having a secret squirrel stash of chopped bananas and/or pineapple in the deep freeze makes it ‘creamier,’ colder and not at risk of being watered down. The matcha tea is entirely optional but I always have a tin of it (owing to a mild addiction to cold green tea with lemon, even in the winter) so tend to put it in smoothies whatever the ingredients. And the citrus enhances green tea’s anti-cancer properties.

To be perfectly honest I would not advocate having something like this every day. I think whole fruits are better because it is easier to know when you have had enough – calories and satiety. But this kind of smoothie is a great way to get green-haters to at least try their enemy and have an opportunity to like them. And homemade smoothies are completely under your control – adjust the taste and amount to your liking, and know exactly what is in it and how fresh it is. Fantastic for control freaks like myself.

So, are you in?

green smoothieA Green Smoothie for the Green-phobe

A cracking way to start the day – a bit tangy, a bit sweet, and a bit green. And there’s green tea powder too if you are like me and don’t do coffee.

The level of deliciousness hinges on the ripeness of the pineapple; don’t go to all the trouble of hacking up an unripe one, just opt for best quality canned or bottled. I’ve never had to do that, but perhaps I’ve just been lucky. Here’s a guide to choosing a ripe pineapple.

1 ripe banana, frozen if possible*

Double handful of baby spinach leaves, or other mild greens of choice, washed (about 2 packed cups)

1 cup diced fresh or quality canned pineapple (frozen too if you can) OR kiwi, peeled

2 clementines, mandarins or satsumas OR 1 large orange, peeled

2 tsp powdered green tea (Japanese-style matcha, not instant) – optional

1 cup almond milk or other milk of choice

5 ice cubes if not using frozen fruit

1. Add all to a blender and blitz until creamy-smooth like an old-fashioned milkshake. Drink immediately.

Note: You can leave out the banana (I’m not a big banana fan) but it does add greatly to the texture, and the pineapple pretty much neutralizes any strong banana taste. Add another banana if you like a more tropical, or sweeter, taste. Or, how about a kiwi?green smoothiegreen smoothie

Serves 2.

Simple Guacamole + How To Choose An Avocado

guacamoleAs a thank you for reading yesterday’s ‘bumper post’ (i.e. tediously long) on Black Bean Quinoa Chili, today I give you the much shorter companion post of Simple Guacamole. This stripped-back version of the popular  dip is the perfect foil for a more complex dish like chili. And a must-have for parties and Super Bowl gatherings. But guacamole is superb with – and indeed in – so many other foods. Because guacamole really needs no introduction I will just let this easy and healthy recipe speak for itself.

Simple Guacamole

The only secret to a good guacamole is to use perfectly ripe avocados, a little salt and a squeeze of fresh lime or lemon. After that, it is down to personal taste. Below the recipe I give add-in suggestions, ideas for how to use guacamole, and hints on how to know when an avocado is ripe.

How do you like your guac?

2 perfectly ripe Hass avocados (see below)

½ lime (or lemon)

½ tsp good salt, like Maldon

Because you aren’t going to be making pretty slices with the avocado, the easiest way of removing the stone is to squeeze the avocado, then slice it in half lengthways – the stone loosens with the initial pressure. Remove the stone (tip of knife/spoon/fingers) and scoop out the flesh with a spoon into a bowl. Immediately squeeze in the lime or lemon juice and crumble in the salt.

Mash well with a fork or a pastry cutter (shown). Most people like their guacamole at least a little chunky so don’t be too enthusiastic with the mashing. Serve immediately, or cover with cling film/food wrap so that it is touching the surface – this helps prevent oxidation/browning.

We find guacamole – and avocados generally – are best at room temperature and used within one or two days. This isn’t a food for keeping. But then again, why would you?

Fripperies:

¼ tsp each of garlic and onion powder (store cupboard option – what I often do)***

½ red onion, finely minced

1 clove garlic, finely minced

1 medium tomato, deseeded, degorged and finely chopped

Jalapeno or serrano chili, deseeded and diced

A few tablespoons of good quality salsa (or homemade, of course)

½ tsp ground cumin

A dash or two of hot sauce or chipotle in adobo

A few tablespoons of fine curd cottage cheese or Quark – to extend the guacamole or make each serving slightly lower in fat (up the seasoning too)

Watermelon, fine dice

Roasted and chopped peppers

Pomegranate seeds (very nice option)

Chopped leaves and soft stem of coriander/cilantro leaves

What to do with your Simple Guacamole. Of course it is perfect with raw vegetables and tortilla chips. But here are a few more ideas:

as a mayonnaise substitute in sandwiches (beautiful with a chicken, bacon or turkey sandwich)

to top chili and in baked potatoes

in quesadillas; on tostados and huevos rancheros

on toast with chopped tomatoes (one of our fave quick breakfasts)

mix into eggs/soft tofu for scrambled eggs or scrambled tofu (yes, really)

add to grain and bean salads

stir into pasta with extra lime and some chilli and tomatoes

mix with hard egg yolk for devilled eggs, or with chopped egg for a no-mayo egg salad.

You get the picture.

Here is a short video to help you decide if your avocado is ripe.

In addition, it is good to look at the little stem knob – flick it off and if it is yellow-green underneath it is ripe, if it is brown – give it a miss as it is already gone over. If you can’t flick it off (i.e. you have to twist it) it will usually need another day or two. Keep ripe avocados in the refrigerator until you use them. To ripen avocados (or at least try to – some never will), pop into a paper bag with another fruit. Or for a slower ripening, just set the under-ripe avocado on top of a bowl of fruit. See this link to ripening avocados for further options and explanations – and a tip NOT to try.

***Low Residue Diet-friendly optionguacamoleavocado shells and pit

Black Bean Quinoa Chili – Super Bowl Supper

black bean quinoa chillIt will not have escaped many people that this weekend is Super Bowl Sunday. I know it is about the culmination of many months of blood, sweat and tears – and that’s just the fans – but there is also a whole lot of eating going on. According to this article, Super Bowl Sunday is the second biggest day of food consumption in the US. This annual fixture is beaten only by the holiday for which Lycra was created – Thanksgiving. Continue reading

Quick and Clean Fragrant Noodle Soup

asian noodle soupMy Rachel, the ‘pop picker’ for food to glow, is smack in the middle of exams. And what does a teen with a heavy diet of exams need? Yup, home cooking. They may want crisps and chocolate and those horrid, blue caffeine-loaded drinks, but we know – and they do too – that good food, in steady doses, is what brain and body need under stress. And a three-hour paper on teleological ethics (nah, me neither) sounds pretty stressful to me. Continue reading